Plagiarism Engine: Google’s Content-Swiping AI Could Break the Internet

Search has always been the Internet’s most important utility. Before Google became dominant, there were many contenders for the search throne, from Altavista to Lycos, Excite, Zap, Yahoo (mainly as a directory) and even Ask Jeeves. The idea behind the World Wide Web is that there’s power in having a nearly infinite number of voices. But with millions of publications and billions of web pages, it would be impossible to find all the information you want without search. 

Google succeeded because it offered the best quality results, loaded quickly and had less cruft on the page than any of its competitors. Now, having taken over 91 percent of the search market, the company is testing a major change to its interface that replaces the chorus of Internet voices with its own robotic lounge singer. Instead of highlighting links to content from expert humans, the “Search Generative Experience” (SGE) uses an AI plagiarism engine that grabs facts and snippets of text from a variety of sites, cobbles them together (often word-for-word) and passes off the work as its creation. If Google makes SGE the default mode for search, the company will seriously damage if not destroy the open web while providing a horrible user experience.

A couple of weeks ago, Google made SGE available to the public in a limited beta (you can sign up here). If you are in the beta program like I am, you will see what the company seems to have planned for the near future: a search results page where answers and advice from Google take up the entire first screen, and you have to scroll way below the fold to see the first organic search result.  

For example, when I searched “best bicycle,” Google’s SGE answer, combined with its shopping links and other cruft took up the first 1,360 vertical pixels of the display before I could see the first actual search result. 

(Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

For its part, Google says that it’s just “experimenting,” and may make some changes before rolling SGE out to everyone as a default experience. The company says that it wants to continue driving traffic offsite.

“We’re putting websites front and center in SGE, designing the experience to highlight and drive attention to content from across the web,” a Google spokesperson told me. “SGE is starting as an experiment in Search Labs, and getting feedback from people is helping us improve the experience and understand how generative AI can be helpful in information journeys. The experiences that ultimately come to Search will likely look different from the experiments you see in Search Labs. As we experiment with new LLM-powered capabilities in Search, we’ll continue to prioritize approaches that will drive valuable traffic to a wide range of creators.” 

By “putting websites front-and-center,” Google is referring to the block of three related-link thumbnails that sometimes (but not always) appear to the right of its SGE answer. These are a fig leaf to publishers, but they’re not always the

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The Online Is Ablaze With Rumors About Miley Cyrus’ ‘Flowers,’ Let’s Break Them Down

 Miley Cyrus at Miley's New Year's Eve Party.

Miley Cyrus at Miley’s New Year’s Eve Bash.

Taylor Swift may be the initial artist who arrives to thoughts when you assume about dissecting someone’s audio in search of Easter eggs about past associations (I imply did you see the “Bejeweled” movie?), but Miley Cyrus just upped the ante. The new queen of New Year’s Eve launched the solitary “Flowers,” forward of the launch of her album Endless Summer time Family vacation, and admirers are likely wild with theories of how the track and music online video reference her ex-partner, actor Liam Hemsworth. Let’s consider a appear at all the clues Cyrus has possibly remaining for us to dissect.

When the announcement arrived that Miley Cyrus was dropping “Flowers” on January 13 — Liam Hemsworth’s birthday — several suspected the former Voice mentor may have some shots to take at her ex-partner. The lyrics appear to assist that principle, particularly the line:

Crafted a residence and viewed it burn.

Miley Cyrus and Liam Hemsworth misplaced their residence in the 2018 Woolsey Fire, which destroyed thousands of households in California and prompted the couple to get married. Which they did afterwards that calendar year, tying the knot in a minimal-important Tennessee ceremony.

Speaking of their wedding ceremony, fans say The Hunger Video games actor dedicated the Bruno Mars track “When I Was Your Man” to his new spouse that evening. So, those listening to “Flowers” couldn’t help but note that some of Miley Cyrus’ lyrics seemed to be in response to the 2013 strike single. Verify out how a single Twitter person broke it down:

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There ended up numerous other references that Miley Cyrus’ supporters seemed to feel were direct shots at her ex. Quite a few people today noted that her dancing in the audio video seemed a whole lot like Joaquin Phoenix’s Oscar-successful character in Joker — which is supposedly Liam Hemsworth’s favored film, in accordance to this tweet and a lot of others on social media.

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The go well with that Miley Cyrus wore in that portion of the video apparently served a double purpose, in accordance to online sleuths. These folks imagine that it not only created an a lot easier comparison to the Joker costume, but it was also potentially a reference to Liam Hemsworth’s wardrobe on the Avengers crimson carpet in 2019, in which numerous imagine the actor was caught on digital camera telling the Hannah Montana alum to “behave.” A person TikToker opined:

Although we’re on the issue of crimson carpet chastising, a lot of admirers observed a correlation in between the “Party in the U.S.A.” singer’s dancing in the “Flowers” audio movie and the moves she tried using to pull on her spouse at Vanity Fair’s 2019 Oscars celebration. This TikTok user was sensation the shade:

One particular of the super common rumors likely close to is that the “Flowers” movie was filmed in a house in which some lovers

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