The Best SEO Conferences In 2022-2023 (Virtual And In-Person)

As an industry in a constant state of flux – thanks to changing algorithms, user needs, and competitor content – search engine optimization is a field that demands professionals to stay up to date on the latest trends and best practices. 

And while you could spend hours scouring the internet for useful articles, forum discussions, and the like, there’s a better way to gain new knowledge and grow your network simultaneously: SEO conferences. 

In just a few hours or days, you can gain a wealth of new information from peers and industry leaders, including information on what’s working and what isn’t and various search engine ranking success strategies.

They allow you to share strategies, brainstorm solutions, and build relationships with current and future SEO leaders.

Of course, in the aftermath of a global pandemic that put the kibosh on in-person events for over a year, many of the top events in SEO went virtual.

Thankfully, as things have started to return to some sense of normalcy, the physical events have often returned.

But don’t worry if you’re still not comfortable going to crowded events with a bunch of strangers; there are plenty of online conferences, summits, and workshops too. 

Here’s a look at some of the best online and in-person SEO conferences for the rest of 2022 and heading into 2023. 

Coming Up In 2022

There have already been several excellent SEO and digital marketing events held this year, but if you missed them, don’t fret. There are still plenty of good ones on the docket. 

You may not even have to travel; with concerns over COVID-19 still high, many events have added virtual components to their in-person events, so you can get all the benefits of attending – without risking your health. 

Inbound 2022

Date: September 6-9, 2022

Format: In-person or online

Location: Boston, MA 

Speakers: Barack Obama, TJ Adeshola, Brian Halligan, and others

Cost: In-person – $1,199; Virtual – free  

About: This annual event is powered by HubSpot, bringing together global thought leaders for a hybrid conference discussing marketing, sales, and customer success operations.

It covers a wide range of topics, including an SEO meetup hosted by Dale Bertrand and strategies for uncovering data-driven insights.

Ad Age Next: Social & Influencer Marketing

Date: September 13, 2022

Format: TBD 

Location: TBD 

Speakers: TBD

Cost: TBD

About: Ad Age’s Next event will focus on the growing importance of influencer marketing in an age of ubiquitous social media.

Creators, brands, and agencies will be on hand to discuss how they are approaching this new economy.

Content Marketing World

Date: September 13-16, 2022

Format: In-person or online

Location: Cleveland, OH 

Speakers: Kim Olson, Alison Jarris, Justin Ethington

Cost: In-person starting from $1,499; Virtual from $699

About: Over four days, attendees will learn strategies for building winning SEO teams, systems, and processes.

With more than 100 sessions, workshops, and industry forums, you can choose the topics and sessions that are relevant to you. Thousands of marketers and representatives from numerous global brands will

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Will the internet’s third iteration free our virtual selves from Big Tech’s control?

Those old enough still remember when sin entered the internet. We have been trying to return to grace ever since.

When Elon Musk announced on 14 April that he is planning to acquire Twitter and turn it into a privately owned company, the message was that he wants to go back to those prelapsarian times when the internet was supposed to make us better. What has happened since then? The large platforms – Google, Facebook, Twitter and others – are no longer neutral arbiters between different world-views but impose their own values. Algorithms are used surreptitiously to manipulate public opinion and create echo chambers. Advertising corrupts thought and expression for the sake of maximum engagement. Twitter is particularly dismal, seemingly designed to promote shallow discussions and a rabid inquisitorial spirit.

Musk claims that the internet has lost its way and promises to return Twitter to a lost age when everyone could freely share ideas and access information. He is right about one thing. The internet has changed. The disagreement is over what went wrong and what to try next.

There have been two internets so far, and some believe a third is on the way. Web1 was decentralised, founded on open protocols – operating rules for the network – like the ones still used for email or websites. Web2 was the internet built by platforms such as Facebook or Google, the companies owning the data on which our economies now depend. Web3 is the internet emerging on decentralised blockchains, such as Bitcoin or Ethereum, which no one owns or controls. For its proponents – the term was introduced by Ethereum co-founder Gavin Wood – Web3 combines the best of both worlds: the decentralisation of Web1 and the immersion and interaction of Web2.

[See also: The spirit of the age: Why the tech billionaires want to leave humanity behind]

How we got from Web1 to Web2 is a complicated story, but it ultimately amounts to a failure of imagination. The creators of the open protocols of the early internet had no idea of what it would become. They still thought the internet would be a kind of entertainment medium similar to television or newspapers. They could not guess its final form: the metaverse, a wholesale replacement for the real world.

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As the internet grew, it was left to the private sector to provide the missing parts. In a virtual world, everyone needs an identity or avatar. Facebook provided them for us. Money from the real world had to be replaced with something else, so advertising filled the gap. We pay with our attention. Suddenly we were all living on the internet, but Facebook owned the data defining our identities, and the world where our lives took place was powered by targeted advertising: the springs of community life now had to serve the purpose of maximising profits for Facebook and its advertisers.

More remarkably, we now accept that these platforms have the

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